Morehead State coach Sean Woods laments ‘entitlement’ attitude of current Cats

Mississippi Valley State head coach Sean Woods barks at his players during first-half action against North Carolina. The North Carolina Tar Heels defeated the Mississippi Valley State Delta Devils, 101-75, at the Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on Sunday, November 20, 2011. (Chris Seward/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT)

Morehead State head coach Sean Woods made some interesting comments about this years’ UK squad during a media teleconference Monday morning. Morehead State faces the Cats on Wednesday night at Rupp Arena. Here is the transcript of the comments about the current team’s “sense of entitlement”:

Woods was asked about UK freshman Willie Cauley-Stein not knowing about the 1992 Christian Laettner shot:

Woods: “You know what, that doesn’t surprise me because kids nowadays are different. When I was growing up I never once saw Wilt Chamberlin play, but I could tell you everything about him. Earl Monroe was way before my time, but I could tell you a lot about him. Kids nowadays play too many video games. I’m just being honest with you. They don’t get it. They play basketball, but they don’t know what basketball is. They are very fortunate. We live in a microwave society now, and it’s a shame that kids don’t know the history. I walked into a deal the other day, with that telethon at WKYT — I didn’t like the vibe. I’m just going to be honest with you. With those guys — it’s just totally different now. And it’s not anyone’s fault, it just the way society is now. I bet you any type of money, beside the kids that are from the Kentucky that are on UK’s team, couldn’t tell you anything about one player in the history of Kentucky basketball. When I walked through that door, I knew about every player, almost everything history-wise about Kentucky basketball, but these kids don’t. It’s a shame, but that’s just how society is.”

Asked to follow up about not liking the vibe at the telethon:

Woods: “They didn’t seem like Kentucky basketball players to me … and I’ll leave it at that. I’m a Kentucky basketball player through and through, and there is just a certain aura about you. Like I told you before, these kids these days are just so different. When I was coming up, we were humble. I think because of the success Cal has created, which is not a bad thing — it is a great thing. It just let’s you know where Kentucky basketball is right now. I am just one of those kids that is a blue-blooded Kentucky guy at heart. There’s just a certain way and a certain look that Kentucky basketball players have, and not have such a sense of entitlement. I think today it is still an honor to wear that uniform. Even though they are coming in one-and-done, what Cal’s created — it’s the only university that it’s happened on a consistent basis. North Carolina’s not doing that all the time, Kansas isn’t doing that all the time and Kentucky is. That’s what sets Kentucky apart from everyone else in the United States. I think these kids should be more appreciative coming through here wearing that uniform, knowing that six months that you are going to be an instant millionaire. But still, you went through there and it helped you become who you are during those six, seven or eight months.”

Woods released a series of tweets at 1 p.m. Monday addressing his comments. “In no way were my comments meant to offend or insult the current players at UK. Simply an observation of today’s youth everywhere. I greatly admire Coach Cal and what he has done for the University of Kentucky and college basketball,” Woods said in a series of three tweets. “I will always be proud to have worn a Kentucky Wildcat uniform and to be the head coach at Morehead State University.”

i say, hang in there coach woods. he’s tough and his players know it and play hard for him. i, once, played for a hot headed coach, for whom i’m glad i played. he did get upset with me, once, and kicked a box. i don’t know what it was doing in the gym, but, anyway, he broke his big toe.

Sean’s comments are right on target and apply to a large percentage of today’s youth in general. However, i fear his words may cause him some distress.

He’s right… most kids today are a bunch of douchebags. We can thank parents that have the “my kid is going to have a better life than I did” mentality for that. By giving kids everything they want and no discipline, you create a society of self-absorbed, entitled, ego-maniacs.